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Book Review: What To Do When You Can’t Decide

Mary Ann Moore

Author: Mary Ann Moore

Article:

What To Do When You Can’t Decide: Useful Tools for Finding the Answers Within

by Meg Lundstrom, ISBN 978-1-59179-816-3

I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t use a form of divination to make decisions about all the possibilities available to me in terms of work, play, social activities, health care etc. I’d be totally overwhelmed! Instead, I use muscle testing, also called kinesiology, which can be done anywhere – in a store when choosing vitamins, in the car when deciding what route to take, and at home when having a look at scheduling and the lengthy to-do list. 

what-to-do-bookcover219  Meg Lundstrom credits Machaelle Small Wright, the founder of Perelandra, a nature research centre, with developing the type of muscle testing described in What to do When You Can’t Decide. Wright says anyone can muscle test to come up with yes or no answers because “it uses your electrical system and your muscles.”

  Lundstrom describes the “basic mechanics” of muscle testing with drawings of the circuit fingers, test fingers and testing position. This is a method that is very portable! 

  The use of the pendulum, or pendling, is also described and I had fun trying out some of the examples. Pendling works very well for making choices about food, a place to live (using a map), diagnosing mechanical problems and even recovering lost objects. Lundstrom includes various charts including one to make decisions around food with the options of daily, often, occasionally, rarely and never. The charts can be customized to accommodate any sorts of decisions.

  Another form of divination which Lundstrom discovered in India, is the use of chits. Chits are small pieces of paper that you throw like the I Ching. You make up the chits yourself with all your options for solving a dilemma.    

  Lundstrom writes very clearly and makes the various forms of divination very enticing. As she says, the answers come from our own bodies. “When we ask a question, brain neurons fire, neurotransmitters flow, electrical currents spark, energy is released into muscle fibers, and something moves to let us know the response on a conscious level – a muscle weakens, a pendulum swings, a chit falls.”

  There are many benefits to divining including bypassing your conscious mind to access deeper wisdom, making life more efficient, and opening up adventurous possibilities. 

 

Mary Ann Moore is a freelance writer, poet and circle facilitator living in Nanaimo. www.maryannmoore.ca

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