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Have You Ever Wondered…?

Anna Christine Doehring

Author: Anna Christine Doehring

Article:

Why we have green lawns but meadows are full of wild flowers?

We use herbicides and pesticides that end up in the ground water, ocean, clouds, rain, soil, and eventually in the food we eat. Did we forget ‘What goes around comes around’ ?

We all love to look at flowers but have green lawns, often even in the backyard. We take hikes to special areas with wild flowers. Some travel to the mainland or as far as South Africa to see meadows covered with beautiful wild flowers.

Some of the flowers in our lawns are even beneficial herbs, like dandelions and daisies. Why do so many eradicate them? Very few people put dandelion leaves and blossoms into their salad. A tea from their roots is very healthy too. Taken internally, dandelions are excellent for anemia, bladder infection, constipation, hemorrhoids, PMS, Hepatitis, liver problems, high blood pressure, IBS, osteoporosis, joint pain, increasing bile production, cleansing blood and liver and others.

The common daisy that grows close to the ground is beneficial for coughs, catarrh, diarrhea, arthritis, migraines, rheumatism and varicose veins. Little girls love daisies to  make wreaths.

The plant meadowsweet loves damp lawns; that is probably interesting for the ones who constantly fight the moss instead of growing a plant that is right for the soil. A tea from its flowers and leaves relieves pain and stops hair loss. The whole plant is a traditional remedy for an acidic stomach. The fresh flowers add an almond flavor to jams.

Animals know about the healing properties of plants. I have a small sickly-looking deer that comes and eats the calendula beside my entrance which is good for internal infections. Usually deer don’t eat them.

In this day and age, why are some still so proud of their boring-looking green lawn? We don’t have to show anymore that we have the money for a gardener. Instead, we can have flowers in front of our house that deer don’t eat, like: catnip, calendula, large daisies, poppies, lavender, rosemary, and others.

‘Your front yard is the prettiest in this area’, a neighbour once told me. Another neighbour had the most beautiful poppies that bloomed a long time last year. Many asked them for seeds.

Did you ever notice how good you feel around flowers and trees? Their presence reduces stress, lowers blood pressure and relieves muscle tension. Measuring the health benefits of plants and gardening is called Horticultural Therapy. In ancient Egypt the physicians prescribed taking walks in gardens with flowers for the mentally disturbed.

When will we be able to step out of the box of societal conditioning regarding green lawns? When will we enjoy the flowers that grow naturally in meadows where all kinds of little insects are happy… most of all the bees who need blossoms all summer long, not only when the fruit trees are blooming?

When will we realize that nature provides everything for us to stay healthy and allow it to grow? When will we have the courage to live with nature, realizing ‘What goes around comes around’?

 

Anna Christine practises Reflexology, JinShinDo and Reconnective Healing®.

This entry was posted on Monday, July 8th, 2013 at 6:44 am and is filed under PONDERING. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Synergy Magazine: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada